SIA And CAAS Partner to Operate First ‘Green Package’ Flights in the World

3 May 2017

Featuring the use of sustainable biofuels, optimised flight operations and SIA’s latest-generation fuel-efficient Airbus A350-900

Committed to the global effort to reduce international aviation emissions, Singapore Airlines (SIA), in partnership with the Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS), has started operating a series of 12 ‘green package’ flights over a three-month period on its non-stop San Francisco-Singapore route.

Featuring SIA’s latest-generation and most fuel-efficient aircraft – the Airbus A350-900 - the ‘green package’ flights are the first in the world to combine the use of biofuels, fuel-efficient aircraft and optimised flight operations. CAAS is facilitating the use of these optimised flight operations and Air Traffic Management (ATM) best practices which reduce fuel burn and carbon emissions for the flights.

The first of the 12 flights, SQ31, departed San Francisco at 1121hrs (San Francisco Time) on 1 May 2017 and arrived in Singapore at 1910 hrs (Singapore Time) on 2 May with 206 passengers on board.

The initiative supports the efforts under the Sustainable Singapore Blueprint (SSB) 2015 to develop Singapore as a Leading Green Economy, where businesses adopt more efficient and sustainable processes and measures to reduce their resource and environmental impact, and contribute towards a Sustainable Singapore. The flights will also raise awareness of sustainable biofuels for aviation and provide the industry with valuable insight on the economics, logistical requirements and performance of biofuels.

USE OF SUSTAINABLE BIOFUELS

Over the three-month period, flight SQ31 will be powered by a combination of HEFA (Hydro-processed Esters and Fatty Acids), a sustainable biofuel produced from used cooking oils, and conventional jet fuel. The biofuel, produced by AltAir Fuels, will be supplied and delivered to San Francisco by SkyNRG in collaboration with North American Fuel Corporation (NAFCO), a wholly owned subsidiary of China Aviation Oil (Singapore), and EPIC Fuels.

According to the International Air Transport Association (IATA), sustainable biofuel is a promising technological solution which will reduce the airline industry’s carbon emissions. It has been certified safe for use in commercial aviation since 2011, and has been in use by airlines in other parts of the world.

ATM BEST PRACTICES

In collaboration with CAAS and air navigation service providers along the flight route, these flights will also employ optimised flight operations, which will reduce fuel burn and carbon emissions. These optimised flight operations include User-Preferred Routes (UPRs), Dynamic Airborne Reroute Procedure (DARP), 30/30 Reduced Oceanic Separation and Time-Based Arrivals Management.1

ONGOING COLLABORATION

Other than the ongoing ‘green-package’ flights, SIA and CAAS have worked together in recent years on several other carbon emissions-reducing initiatives in international aviation. In January 2010, both organisations participated in the Asia and Pacific Initiative to Reduce Emissions (ASPIRE ) programme with a demonstration flight from Los Angeles to Singapore via Tokyo which yielded fuel savings of 6%.

In May 2011, CAAS and SIA launched regular ASPIRE flights on the Los Angeles-Singapore route. Over the years, routes to various destinations in the Southwest Pacific, including Auckland, Christchurch, Melbourne and Sydney, were incrementally added to the ASPIRE programme, the latest addition being SIA’s ‘Capital Express’ service between Singapore, Canberra and Wellington in September 2016. The series of 12 ‘green package’ flights will also adopt ATM best practices from the ASPIRE programme.

Singapore Airlines is also a member of the Sustainable Aviation Fuel Users Group (SAFUG), which was established in 2008 to accelerate the development and commercialisation of sustainable biofuels for aviation, derived from environmentally and socially-sustainable sources.

“Singapore Airlines’ fleet is already among the most modern and fuel-efficient in the world. We now want to push ourselves further and are embarking on this initiative to help promote the use of sustainable biofuel in an operationally and commercially-viable manner. This is in line with our long-term commitment to further reduce carbon emissions while improving the efficiency of our operations. This initiative is especially memorable as our first biofuel flight departed from San Francisco on 1 May, when Singapore Airlines celebrated its 70th anniversary,” said SIA’s Chief Executive Officer, Mr Goh Choon Phong.

“CAAS is pleased to support and participate in this initiative. This is part of CAAS’ ongoing effort to develop new initiatives to achieve the sustainable growth of aviation. Collaboration is key in this effort. CAAS is therefore committed to continuing our work with industry partners to advance and drive greater innovation on this front, ” said Director-General of CAAS, Mr Kevin Shum.

User-Preferred Routes (UPRs) refer to flight routes during the oceanic phase of flight customised based on factors such as weather and aircraft performance. Dynamic Airborne Reroute Procedure (DARP) is a procedure that allows for periodic modification of a flight’s lateral profile, based on updated weather forecasts, to save fuel. 30/30 Reduced Oceanic Separation refers to measures allowing for reduced separation distance between aircraft during the oceanic phase of flight. Time-Based Arrivals Management refers to traffic flow management procedures and automated decision support automation which reduce holding time in the air for arriving flights.

The ASPIRE programme is a partnership between air navigation service providers which share the aim to reduce carbon emissions from fuel burn in all phases of flight, through best practices and initiatives in air traffic management and flight operation procedures. Examples include measures that permit pilots to take full advantage of atmospheric conditions, such as prevailing winds, to reduce separation between aircraft and shorten flight time.



About Singapore Airlines:

The SIA Group’s history dates back to 1947 with the maiden flight of Malayan Airways Limited. The airline was later re-named Malaysian Airways Limited and then Malaysia-Singapore Airlines (MSA). In 1972, MSA split into Singapore Airlines (SIA) and Malaysian Airline System. Initially operating a modest fleet of 10 aircraft to 22 cities in 18 countries, SIA’s commitment to service excellence, product leadership and network connectivity quickly distinguished it as a world-class international airline group. SIA and its subsidiaries today employ around 25,000 staff, with the world-famous Singapore Girl as an iconic symbol of quality customer care and service.

About the Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore:

The mission of the Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS) is to “Grow a safe, vibrant air hub and civil aviation system, making a key contribution to Singapore's success”. CAAS' roles are to oversee and promote safety in the aviation industry, develop the air hub and aviation industry, provide air navigation services, develop Singapore as a centre for aviation knowledge and training, and contribute to the development of international aviation.

For further information, please contact:

Singapore Airlines Public Affairs Department

Tel: (65) 6541-5880 (office hours)
Tel: (65) 9753-2126 (after office hours)
Email: Public_Affairs@singaporeair.com.sg
Website: www.singaporeair.com

Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore

Contact: Ms Cindy Peh, Deputy Manager (Corporate Communications)
Tel: (65) 6541 2913
Mobile: (65) 9223 3281
E-mail: cindy_peh@caas.gov.sg
Website: www.caas.gov.sg



Last Updated on 12 Dec 2018