Augmenting ATM Capabilities Using Technology

Air Traffic Flow Management enables the regulations of air traffic in the most efficient manner by taking into account airport or air traffic control capacity. It can also help to better manage cross-border flow of air traffic in the Asia Pacific region.

Here are some of the key technologies adopted:

Air Traffic Management System – LORADS

Singapore first adopted the LORADS I (acronym for “Long Range Radar and Display System”) air traffic management system in 1981 to support the commencement of operations at Changi Airport.

In anticipation of growing air traffic demands, CAAS adopted LORADS III, the third generation air traffic control system, in 2014. LORADS III, a state-of-the-art system developed by Thales, presents a generational shift in operational capabilities and robustness to offer the following benefits:

  • A paperless, highly automated and integrated environment;
  • Technologies and innovative features with enhanced aircraft navigational accuracy and functionality;
  • A significant increase in traffic handling capacity;
  • A comprehensive air situation picture with the fusion of data from multiple surveillance sources;
  • Unprecedented layers of safety nets and redundancies.

Airport Collaborative Decision Making (A-CDM)

The focus of the Airport Collaborative Decision Making (A-CDM) concept is to establish procedures and systems to co-ordinate sharing and usage of operational data amongst airport partners [including airport operators, airlines, ground handlers and air traffic control (ATC)]. Through information sharing, A-CDM aims to enhance situational awareness and aid in decision-making processes by airport workers – leading to improved operational efficiency and optimised use of resources.

For example, based on an accurate prediction of the aircraft’s readiness for departure (through information provided by ground handlers and airlines), ATC can plan an optimal pre-departure sequence at which aircraft are dispatched from the parking stands, thus reducing time spent by the aircraft idling before take-off.

Air Traffic Flow Management (ATFM)

Air Traffic Flow Management enables us to regulate air traffic in the most efficient manner by taking into account airport or air traffic control capacity. It can also help us better manage cross-border flow of air traffic in the Asia Pacific region.

Example:

In 2013, CAAS initiated a research collaboration project with Airbus ProSky to develop a new regional Multi-Nodal ATFM concept. This concept involved looking at interconnected information sharing platforms between participating regional partners. Based on the idea of a multi-nodal network, ATFM nodes (comprising of ANSPs and associated stakeholders such as airport operators and airspace users) are set up, with sharing of information (e.g. take-off and landing times) between nodes. With greater awareness of air traffic flow comes more efficient balancing of demand and capacity at airports.

ATS Inter-Facility Data Communication (AIDC)

ATS Inter-Facility Data Communication (AIDC) refers to the automation of certain routine coordination between Air Traffic Services units. It provides a reliable and timely means of conducting coordination, mitigating errors that occasionally occur when voice coordination is used. With routine coordination woven into the AIDC workflow, controllers’ workload has also been reduced.



Last Updated on 26 August 2017